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The location of the Achilles tendon is in the back of the leg and its function is to connect the heel bone to the calf muscle. If an injury should occur to this tendon, noticeable symptoms may include severe pain, difficulty in walking, or your ankles may feel weak. Many patients are unable to fully stand on the leg and swelling or bruising may be apparent. There are several causes as to why the Achilles tendon may rupture, and these may include falling unexpectedly, pivoting suddenly while participating in running or jumping activities, or ingesting specific types of medication, which may increase the chances of injuring this tendon. Research has shown if the calf muscles are gently stretched before sporting activity begins, the Achilles tendon may lengthen and become more flexible. If you feel you have injured this specific tendon, it is advised to seek the counsel of a podiatrist who can offer proper treatment advice.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Louis White of Michigan. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What are the symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Jackson, MI. We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Achilles Tendon Injuries
Monday, 19 November 2018 00:00

Reminder - When was the last time...

Custom orthotics (shoe inserts) should be replaced periodically. They need to fit properly to give you the best results. Protect your feet and ankles.

Monday, 19 November 2018 00:00

Symptoms of a Broken Foot

Research has shown that one out of ten broken bones happens in the foot. If tripping, falling, or dropping a heavy object on your foot occurs, you may experience a painful condition known as a broken foot. You will immediately notice symptoms that may include severe pain and swelling, possibly hindering the ability to walk, and bruising or tenderness. Additionally, the toes may be deformed if the bones appear to be dislocated. If you have fallen and you think your foot may be fractured, a proper diagnosis must be performed that will confirm the broken foot. This is typically accomplished by having an X-ray taken, followed by a discussion of proper treatment methods. These may include keeping the foot stable by wearing a supportive boot. Other options may include the use of a splint or cast, and crutches would generally accompany this. If you feel you have broken your foot, it is strongly advised to speak to a podiatrist, so the correct treatment can be chosen.

A broken foot requires immediate medical attention and treatment. If you need your feet checked, contact Dr. Louis White from Michigan. Our doctor  can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Broken Foot Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

A broken foot is caused by one of the bones in the foot typically breaking when bended, crushed, or stretched beyond its natural capabilities. Usually the location of the fracture indicates how the break occurred, whether it was through an object, fall, or any other type of injury. 

Common Symptoms of Broken Feet:

  • Bruising
  • Pain
  • Redness
  • Swelling
  • Blue in color
  • Numbness
  • Cold
  • Misshapen
  • Cuts
  • Deformities

Those that suspect they have a broken foot shoot seek urgent medical attention where a medical professional could diagnose the severity.

Treatment for broken bones varies depending on the cause, severity and location. Some will require the use of splints, casts or crutches while others could even involve surgery to repair the broken bones. Personal care includes the use of ice and keeping the foot stabilized and elevated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Jackson, MI. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment for a Broken Foot
Monday, 12 November 2018 00:00

What Causes Cuboid Syndrome?

The cuboid bone is located in the mid portion of the foot. There are several bones that surround it, and may often become noticed after an injury has occurred. If an ankle sprain happens, the cuboid bone may become displaced, and may often be gently manipulated back into place. There are several symptoms that may be associated with this uncomfortable condition, including a feeling of weakness in the ankle and foot, significant swelling, and the area may be tender when touched. Research has shown that common causes for this type of ailment to occur is typically an injury to the foot or trauma the foot endures. People who are actively involved in sports may be prone to develop cuboid syndrome, and this may be a result of excessive running or jumping. It’s suggested to speak with a podiatrist if you feel you have developed this condition so proper treatment techniques and advice can begin, which may include wearing insoles that support the arch.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Dr. Louis White  from Michigan. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Jackson, MI. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Living with foot pain is hard on your body.  Give us a call and let us find out what's wrong.

Monday, 05 November 2018 00:00

Symptoms Of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

The medical condition that is referred to as tarsal tunnel syndrome typically affects the ligaments that stretch across the foot. These are known to provide flexibility and stability to the foot, and may become irritated and inflamed if they are compressed. This may occur as a result from an injury or trauma the foot endures, possibly due to performing repetitive motions. There are several symptoms that are associated with this condition. Many patients will notice a burning or tingling sensation in their foot and may also be accompanied by a shooting pain in the ankle. If you have injured your foot or have pain in the ankle that develops gradually, it’s suggested to speak with a podiatrist so a proper diagnosis can be performed, and the correct treatment can begin.

Tarsal tunnel syndrome can be very uncomfortable to live with. If you are experiencing tarsal tunnel syndrome, contact Dr. Louis White of Michigan. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Tarsal tunnel syndrome, which can also be called tibial nerve dysfunction, is an uncommon condition of misfiring peripheral nerves in the foot. The tibial nerve is the peripheral nerve in the leg responsible for sensation and movement of the foot and calf muscles. In tarsal tunnel syndrome, the tibial nerve is damaged, causing problems with movement and feeling in the foot of the affected leg.

Common Cause of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome
- Involves pressure or an injury, direct pressure on the tibial nerve for an extended period of time, sometimes caused by other body structures close by or near the knee.
- Diseases that damage nerves, including diabetes, may cause tarsal tunnel syndrome.
- At times, tarsal tunnel syndrome can appear without an obvious cause in some cases.

The Effects of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome
- Different sensations, an afflicted person may experience pain, tingling, burning or other unusual sensations in the foot of the affected leg.
- The foot muscles, toes and ankle become weaker, and curling your toes or flexing your foot can become difficult.
- If condition worsens, infections and ulcers may develop on the foot that is experiencing the syndrome.

A physical exam of the leg can help identify the presence of tarsal tunnel syndrome. Medical tests, such as a nerve biopsy, are also used to diagnose the condition. Patients may receive physical therapy and prescriptive medication. In extreme cases, some may require surgery.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Jackson, MI. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Treating Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome
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